Columbia Falls Day Camp

$75.00

Program Start Date:

06/16/2021

EVERY WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY DURING THE SUMMER – Your kids want more out of their summer! Sign them up for our Columbia Falls Day Camp happening every Wednesday & Friday for ages 7-11.

Columbia Falls Day Camp

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Description

Columbia Falls Day Camp
Ages 7-11
Every Wednesday and Friday starting June 16th
Cost: $75 per day or all 18 days for $1,000 (a savings of $350)
*Reminder all members get 10% off*

Join us this summer for Columbia Falls Day camps. All of our activities for the day will revolve around our central theme We will begin by getting to know each other before introducing topics such as wildlife safety and leave no trace principles. Our day will consist of a field trip,  hands-on activities, games, art projects, exploration and a short hike all focused at exploring the theme of the day.

Time: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Drop-off & Pick-up Location: Glacier Institute Gazebo – Located at 320 Nucleus Ave., Columbia Falls, MT

Daily Topics:

June 16 – Habitats: Who’s house is this? This habitat is home to many different animals, from hummingbirds to beavers to mountain lions. We will spend the day learning about the many different habitats in our ecosystem and who lives where. We will also have a chance to build some shelters of our own!

June 18 – Bears: What types of bears call the Flathead Valley home? Do bears like huckleberries? What do they do in the summer? What do they do in the winter? Come learn with us as we dive deeper into the lives of bears. We will spend the day learning more about these interesting creatures.

June 23 – Wildflowers: Does someone plant all the wildflowers? How do these spectacular plants end up scattered all over our landscape? Are there certain wildflowers that prefer certain habitats? Come learn with us as we dive into all things wildflowers. We will spend the day exploring wildflowers, and how they end up scattered all over our landscape.

June 25 – Songbirds: Do different birds prefer different habitats? Do they all spend time soaring high in the sky? Do any rely on underwater bugs as food? Do they all have hollow bones? Today we will spend time unearthing some of the most fascinating facts about these amazing winged wonders!

June 30 – Fish: What types of fish call our waterways home? What do these creatures eat? Do any of them have unique life challenges? Why do we care about the fish? What is the history of these fish in our region? We will spend the day working towards a deeper understanding of our local fish, and their unique history.

July 2 – Aquatic Insects: Do insects have bones or an exoskeleton? Can insects live both in water and on land? Have you ever wondered what fish eat? What sort of life cycle do insects have? Where can you find aquatic insects? We will head out to Big Creek Outdoor Education center for the day to learn about the wild world of insects hidden beneath the water.

July 7 – Reduce, reuse, recycle: What happens to items when we throw them out? Where does our trash go after its life in our trash can? What ways can we reduce the amount of trash we produce? What does it mean to reuse? What does it mean to recycle? What items can we recycle? Join us as we dig a little deeper into the truth of the life of many of our household items.

July 9 – Geology and Glaciers: How do rocks form? Are there different types of rocks? How did these rocks get here? How long have these rocks been here? How did these massive mountains form? What makes the mountains here special? Today we will spend the day learning about rocks, glaciers, and how they have shaped the landscape that surrounds us.

July 14 – Trees: How can trees grow so tall? What is photosynthesis? What trees are coniferous and what trees are deciduous? Are there trees here that can resist fire? What is a serotinous cone? How do trees spread their seeds? Today we will spend the day learning about the many different trees around us and the unique adaptations that many of them have.

July 16 – Birds of Prey: What is a “bird of prey”? Do any live in the Flathead Valley? If so, which ones? Are these birds only active during the day? Or are there some that are most active at night? We will spend the day learning about some of their unique traits and secrets to their success.

July 21 – Garden/Food/Compost: Where do our fruits and veggies come from? Are there farms in the flathead valley that grow and sell produce? What else is being grown or made on nearby farms? What happens to unused plant scraps at these farms? What happens to food waste that we decide to compost instead of throw out? What does it mean to compost? Join us as we dive a little deeper into the “lifecycle” of plant material.

July 23 – Plants & Trees: How can trees grow so tall? What is photosynthesis? What trees are coniferous and what trees are deciduous? Are there trees here that can resist fire? What is a serotinous cone? How do trees spread their seeds? Today we will spend the day learning about the many different trees around us and the unique adaptations that many of them have.

July 28 – Mammals (skulls, pelts and tracks): Nearby Glacier National Park is home to 71 different species of mammals. Are there mammals here that swim? Do any of them hibernate? Who is the largest member of the weasel family? Who has eyes on the side or eyes on the front? We will spend the day unearthing the unique characteristics that are special to many of these critters.

July 30 – Fish: What types of fish call our waterways home? What do these creatures eat? Do any of them have unique life challenges? Why do we care about the fish? What is the history of these fish in our region? We will spend the day working towards a deeper understanding of our local fish, and their unique history.

August 4 – Our Watershed: The head of our watershed is Glacier National Park. There are 762 lakes, and 563 streams in the Park – that’s a lot of water! How did all these lakes and streams get here? Where does all the water come from? Where does it go when it leaves Glacier National Park? Where does it go when it leaves Montana? What is a watershed? Come dive into the fascinating world of water with us as we figure out the answers to these questions.

August 6 – Wetland: What is a wetland? What are different components of a wetland? Why are wetlands important? What different animals call these areas home? Today we will spend the day learning all about wetlands and their role in our ecosystem.

August 11 – Mammals (skulls, pelts and tracks): Nearby Glacier National Park is home to 71 different species of mammals. Are there mammals here that swim? Do any of them hibernate? Who is the largest member of the weasel family? Who has eyes on the side or eyes on the front? We will spend the day unearthing the unique characteristics that are special to many of these critters.

August 13 – Wildfire: What is a wildfire? How can they start? What happens to them over time? What can we do to avoid accidentally starting one? Are there any plants that rely on wildfires for different parts of their life? What about animals? Have there been any historic wildfires in our ecosystem? Come dive into the wild world of wildfires, we will spend the day answering these questions and many more.

Food: Please bring a sack lunch, a few snacks, and a full 32oz. water bottle

What to Bring?

  • Day pack
  • Full 32oz. water bottle
  • Sack lunch and snacks
  • Sturdy shoes
  • Rain gear, warm clothes (check the weather forecast in advance)
  • Change of clothes
  • Notebook and pencil

Activity Level: We will hike less than two miles round trip at a leisurely pace, on and off trail through brush and over rocks with an elevation gain and loss of 100ft.

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Did you know Glacier Institute members receive a 10% discount?